Succulent Sunday: Propagation

I’ll admit it. I have a problem. I am addicted to succulents. You may remember a few weeks ago, when I shared a tutorial on how to make a succulent container garden. In that post, I mentioned that I was going to attempt to propagate a leaf from one of the new succulents.

I decided to take a look around my ever-growing succulent collection to see if any of my plants would benefit from propagation. And then I found these babies at work.

Leggy Succulent

Can you say “leggy succulent”?! While I’m happy that these succulents survived the Sconnie winter, it’s obvious they had a serious lack of sunshine. Succulents thrive on sunlight and those gray, gloomy days of winter did not provide the needed sunlight. That said, the sedum succulent needed a little TLC.

I started by gently removing the leaves from the bottom of the plant. One of the best ways to do this is to gently move it left to right until the leaf pops off easily. If you damage the end of the leaf, it won’t propagate.

succulent propagation

Once you get to the head of the succulent, take a clean set of scissors and snip it off.

succulent leaves for propagation

succulent propagation

Lay the leaves and heads of the succulents out for 1-3 days or until the ends callous over. You’ll want them to get some sunlight but not be in direct sunlight or they will burn. Indirect sunlight is best.

propagating succulents with leaves

I checked on the leaves every day.

succulents callous

succulent callous2

Once the leaves callous over, it’s time to move them!  Since I had so many leaves, I prepped a large ceramic dish I made in college for propagating baby succulents.

laying out succulent leaves

I put a layer of small stones for drainage and then covered them with cactus soil. Then, I placed all the leaves in rows in the dish.

layingoutsucculents

You might have noticed that I also included the stems of the succulents I am propagating. I have done some reading and it’s possible to propagate from the stems, so I figured it was worth a shot! I’m checking the soil daily and if it’s dry, I am spraying lightly with water from a water bottle. 

The top cuttings from the succulents I’m propagating were placed into a small pot so they can begin rooting. 

succulent cuttings

I’ve done a lot of research on best practices for propagating succulents with leaves and cuttings. I’ve had success with cuttings in the past and am looking forward to trying out leaf propagation!

succulent terrarium

Luckily, I already know what to look for since I received some bonus baby succulents in one of the succulent pots I bought last weekend for new terrariums. I immediately put them in their own “pots” (mason jars – one of my other obsessions) and hope they survive!

babysucculents

babysucculents2

I’ve learned that succulent cuttings and leaves need lots of water in order to propagate, but once they get to be about the size of the photo below, you can start to withhold water and the new baby succulent will pull its moisture from the original leaf. Once it shrivels and falls off, you can treat the new plant as you would any other succulent.

babysucculents5

I have found some great resources for succulent propagation and care. One of my favorite resources is Succulents and Sunshine. Cassidy Tuttle has even written two eBooks (both of which I purchased and reference often). Click the images at the bottom of this post to check them out!

Another great resource is Needles & Leaves. I have often referenced the post about propagating leggy succulents.

I’ll be posting weekly updates on the progress of my propagation experiment. 

Click here to visit Succulents and Sunshine.
Click here to visit Succulents and Sunshine*
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